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Harvesting Coffee

25 Oct

Coffee blossoms

My husband was talking with a neighbor one day. The neighbor noticed our coffee trees and said,

Oh, is it much work to grow coffee?

My husband immediately replied,

No, not at all.

I was standing behind him and my jaw dropped!!!

What do you think?

Here’s what I do to harvest coffee.

Plant the trees with some gypsum to help neutralize our alkaline soil.

Add pine needles to further acidify it,

Water and fertilize heavily.

Prune.

Pick the coffee cherries as they turn red.

Discard any that float.

Take the outer red skin off.

Ferment for 24 to 48 hours, no longer.

Dry the beans in the sun for about two weeks.

Crack off the parchment coating.

(My husband did discover that gently crushing the beans between two boards made it much easier to get the parchment off.)

Green beans on the left, parchment on the right.

Store the ‘green’ beans until ready to roast. Then roast, grind and enjoy a great cuppa as seen here.

The coffee trees  aren’t suited to this desert and lower altitude, so I spend extra time hosing them off to make them think they don’t grow in the desert.

Does your husband think things happen easily? I would never say it isn’t any work to harvest the coffee like my hubby. He is however, a master of making things easy. It’s one of the things that attracted me to him. In addition to figuring out that crushing the parchment makes it easier to remove; he also discovered that smashing the ripe cherries between two cutting boards speeds that process up by 80%. He put water lines on our plants and cut my watering time by about 95%. I love efficiency, so I can do more things.

I have my comments off because I won’t be home till next week. Today I am spending my last day in Kyoto, Japan. I must eat some sesame tofu, (made from sesame instead of soybeans). It’s so yummy. I wish I could give you some. XD

© 2010 Jeanne Litt, All rights reserved.

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Posted by on October 25, 2010 in Abundance, garden, How to

 

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