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WEDNESDAY — MY EXPERIENCE WITH CREATING ABUNDANCE

Plumeria

 

My journey from poverty consciousness to abundance made big strides once I found Ron and Mary Hulnick’s book, FISCAL FITNESS.

It is in workbook format and I worked it.

My understanding is that two key concepts are to track your finances and to creatively visualize your goals and dreams.

It seemed like a short time and I was in the black. I treasure this book and would never give it up. The Hulnick’s have a newer version out, (1994) called FINANCIAL FREEDOM IN 8 MINUTES A DAY – How To Attract And Manage All The Money You’ll Ever Need. There are cassette tapes available that are helpful to hear. You can play affirmations related to wealth.

If I  feel contracted or worried about money, listening takes me to a better place, back where I want to be.

When I first started with the program, I was single. Now in marriage, my husband does the tracking and I am more of the creative visualizer. Actually, I could use redoing our ideal scenes –  visualizations of how we want our wealth to be proceeding.

I love reading the book. Any page in it. If I open it up and read anything, I feel supported and comforted. If you want powerful, gentle supportive direction regarding your finances: try this book. Financial freedom awaits.

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Posted by on March 23, 2011 in Abundance, Book Review

 

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Pray for Japan

Insider Perspective on Japan’s Current Emergency

Here is a post by an American living and working in Japan. I got it from Japan Living Arts

Patrick: I run a small software business in central Japan. Over the years, I’ve worked both in the local Japanese government (as a translator) and in Japanese industry (as a systems engineer), and have some minor knowledge of how things are done here. English-language reporting on the earthquake/tsunami situation has been so bad that my mother is worried for my safety, so in the interests of clearing the air I thought I would write up a bit of what I know.

A Quick Primer On Japanese Geography

Japan is an archipelago made up of many islands, of which there are four main ones: Honshu, Shikoku, Hokkaido, and Kyushu. The one that almost everybody outside of the country will think of when they think “Japan” is Honshu: in addition to housing Tokyo, Nagoya, Osaka, Kyoto, and virtually every other city that foreigners have heard of, it has most of Japan’s population and economic base. Honshu is the big island that looks like a banana on your globe, and was directly affected by the earthquake and tsunami…

… to an extent, anyway. See, the thing that people don’t realize is that Honshu is massive. It is larger than Great Britain (a country which does not typically refer to itself as a “tiny island nation.”) At about 800 miles long, it stretches from roughly Chicago to New Orleans. Quite a lot of the reporting on Japan, including that which is scaring the heck out of my friends and family, is the equivalent of someone ringing up Mayor Daley during Katrina and saying “My God man, that’s terrible — how are you coping?”

The public perception of Japan, at home and abroad, is disproportionately influenced by Tokyo’s outsized contribution to Japanese political, economic, and social life. It also gets more news coverage than warranted because one could poll every journalist in North America and not find one single soul who could put Miyagi or Gifu on a map. So let’s get this out of the way: Tokyo, like virtually the whole island of Honshu, got a bit shaken and no major damage was done. They have reported 1 fatality caused by the earthquake. By comparison, on any given Friday, Tokyo will typically have more deaths caused by traffic accidents. (Tokyo is also massive.)

Miyagi is the prefecture hardest hit by the tsunami, and Japanese TV is reporting that they expect fatalities in the prefecture to exceed 10,000. Miyagi is 200 miles from Tokyo. (Remember — Honshu is massive.) That’s about the distance between New York and Washington DC.

Japanese Disaster Preparedness

Japan is exceptionally well-prepared to deal with natural disasters: it has spent more on the problem than any other nation, largely as a result of frequently experiencing them. (Have you ever wondered why you use Japanese for “tsunamis” and “typhoons”?) All levels of the government, from the Self Defense Forces to technical translators working at prefectural technology incubators in places you’ve never heard of, spend quite a bit of time writing and drilling on what to do in the event of a disaster.

For your reference, as approximately the lowest person on the org chart for Ogaki City (it’s in Gifu, which is fairly close to Nagoya, which is 200 miles from Tokyo, which is 200 miles from Miyagi, which was severely affected by the earthquake), my duties in the event of a disaster were:

* Ascertain my personal safety.
* Report to the next person on the phone tree for my office, which we drilled once a year.
* Await mobalization in case response efforts required English or Spanish translation.

Ogaki has approximately 150,000 people. The city’s disaster preparedness plan lists exactly how many come from English-speaking countries. It is less than two dozen. Why have a maintained list of English translators at the ready? Because Japanese does not have a word for excessive preparation.

Another anecdote: I previously worked as a systems engineer for a large computer consultancy, primarily in making back office systems for Japanese universities. One such system is called a portal: it lets students check on, e.g., their class schedule from their cell phones.

The first feature of the portal, printed in bold red ink and obsessively tested, was called Emergency Notification. Basically, we were worried about you attempting to check your class schedule while there was a wall of water coming to inundate your campus, so we built in the capability to take over all pages and say, essentially, “Forget about class. Get to shelter now.”

Many of our clients are in the general vicinity of Tokyo. When Nagoya (again, same island but very far away) started shaking during the earthquake, here’s what happened:

1. T-0 seconds: Oh dear, we’re shaking.
2. T+5 seconds: Where was that earthquake?
3. T+15 seconds: The government reports that we just had a magnitude 8.8 earthquake off the coast of East Japan. Which clients of ours are implicated?
4. T+30 seconds: Two or three engineers in the office start saying “I’m the senior engineer responsible for X, Y, and Z universities.”
5. T+45 seconds: “I am unable to reach X University’s emergency contact on the phone. Retrying.” (Phones were inundated virtually instantly.)
6. T+60 seconds: “I am unable to reach X University’s emergency contact on the phone. I am declaring an emergency for X University. I am now going to follow the X University Emergency Checklist.”
7. T+90 seconds: “I have activated emergency systems for X University remotely. Confirm activation of emergency systems.”
8. T+95 seconds: (second most senior engineer) “I confirm activation of emergency systems for X University.”
9. T+120 seconds: (manager of group) ”Confirming emergency system activations, sound off: X University.” ”Systems activated.” ”Confirmed systems activated.” ”Y University.” ”Systems activated.” ”Confirmed systems activated.” …

While this is happening, it’s somebody else’s job to confirm the safety of the colleagues of these engineers, at least a few of whom are out of the office at client sites. Their checklist helpfully notes that confirmation of the safety of engineers should be done by visual inspection first, because they’ll be really effing busy for the next few minutes.

So that’s the view of the disaster from the perspective of a wee little office several hundred miles away, responsible for a system which, in the scheme of things, was of very, very minor importance.

Scenes like this started playing out up and down Japan within, literally, seconds of the quake.

When the mall I was in started shaking, I at first thought it was because it was a windy day (Japanese buildings are designed to shake because the alternative is to be designed to fail catastrophically in the event of an earthquake), until I looked out the window and saw the train station. A train pulling out of the station had hit the emergency breaks and was stopped within 20 feet — again, just someone doing what he was trained for. A few seconds after the train stopped, after reporting his status, he would have gotten on the loudspeakers and apologized for inconvenience caused by the earthquake. (Seriously, it’s in the manual.)

Everything Pretty Much Worked

Let’s talk about trains for a second. Four One of them were washed away by the tsunami. [Edited to add: Initial reports were incorrect — four were accounted as missing and presumed lost, but it just reflected communication issues — three were safe, they were just not known to be safe.] All of the rest — including ones travelling in excess of 150 miles per hour — made immediate emergency stops and no one died. There were no derailments. There were no collisions. There was no loss of control. The story of Japanese railways during the earthquake and tsunami is the story of an unceasing drumbeat of everything going right.

This was largely the story up and down Honshu. Planes stayed in the sky. Buildings stayed standing. Civil order continued uninterrupted.

On the train line between Ogaki and Nagoya, one passes dozens of factories, including notably a beer distillery which holds beer in pressure tanks painted to look like gigantic beer bottles. Many of these factories have large amounts of extraordinarily dangerous chemicals maintained, at all times, in conditions which would resemble fuel-air bombs if they had a trigger attached to them. None of them blew up. There was a handful of very photogenic failures out east, which is an occupational hazard of dealing with large quantities of things that have a strongly adversarial response to materials like oxygen, water, and chemists. We’re not going to stop doing that because modern civilization and it’s luxuries like cars, medicine, and food are dependent on industry.

The overwhelming response of Japanese engineering to the challenge posed by an earthquake larger than any in the last century was to function exactly as designed. Millions of people are alive right now because the system worked and the system worked and the system worked.

That this happened was, I say with no hint of exaggeration, one of the triumphs of human civilization. Every engineer in this country should be walking a little taller this week. We can’t say that too loudly, because it would be inappropriate with folks still missing and many families in mourning, but it doesn’t make it any less true.

Let’s Talk Nukes

There is currently a lot of panicked reporting about the problems with two of Tokyo Electric’s nuclear power generation plants in Fukushima. Although few people would admit this out loud, I think it would be fair to include these in the count of systems which functioned exactly as designed. For more detail on this from someone who knows nuclear power generation, which rules out him being a reporter, see here.

* The instant response — scramming the reactors — happened exactly as planned and, instantly, removed the Apocalyptic Nightmare Scenarios from the table.
* There were some failures of important systems, mostly related to cooling the reactor cores to prevent a meltdown. To be clear, a meltdown is not an Apocalyptic Nightmare Scenario: the entire plant is designed such that when everything else fails, the worst thing that happens is somebody gets a cleanup bill with a whole lot of zeroes in it.
* Failure of the systems is contemplated in their design, which is why there are so many redundant ones. You won’t even hear about most of the failures up and down the country because a) they weren’t nuclear related (a keyword which scares the heck out of some people) and b) redundant systems caught them.
* The tremendous public unease over nuclear power shouldn’t be allowed to overpower the conclusion: nuclear energy, in all the years leading to the crisis and continuing during it, is absurdly safe. Remember the talk about the trains and how they did exactly what they were supposed to do within seconds? Several hundred people still drowned on the trains. That is a tragedy, but every person connected with the design and operation of the railways should be justifiably proud that that was the worst thing that happened. At present, in terms of radiation risk, the tsunami appears to be a wash: on the one hand there’s a near nuclear meltdown, on the other hand the tsunami disrupted something really dangerous: international flights. (One does not ordinarily associate flying commercial airlines with elevated radiation risks. Then again, one doesn’t normally associate eating bananas with it, either. When you hear news reports of people exposed to radiation, keep in mind, at the moment we’re talking a level of severity somewhere between “ate a banana” and “carries a Delta Skymiles platinum membership card”.)

What You Can Do

Far and away the worst thing that happened in the earthquake was that a lot of people drowned. Your thoughts and prayers for them and their families are appreciated. This is terrible, and we’ll learn ways to better avoid it in the future, but considering the magnitude of the disaster we got off relatively lightly. (An earlier draft of this post said “lucky.” I have since reworded because, honestly, screw luck. Luck had absolutely nothing to do with it. Decades of good engineering, planning, and following the bloody checklist are why this was a serious disaster and not a nation-ending catastrophe like it would have been in many, many other places.)

Japan’s economy just got a serious monkey wrench thrown into it, but it will be back up to speed fairly quickly. (By comparison, it was probably more hurt by either the Leiman Shock or the decision to invent a safety crisis to help out the US auto industry. By the way, wondering what you can do for Japan? Take whatever you’re saying currently about “We’re all Japanese”, hold onto it for a few years, and copy it into a strongly worded letter to your local Congresscritter the next time nativism runs rampant.)

A few friends of mine have suggested coming to Japan to pitch in with the recovery efforts. I appreciate your willingness to brave the radiological dangers of international travel on our behalf, but that plan has little upside to it: when you get here, you’re going to be a) illiterate b) unable to understand instructions and c) a productivity drag on people who are quite capable of dealing with this but will instead have to play Babysit The Foreigner. If you’re feeling compassionate and want to do something for the sake of doing something, find a charity in your neighborhood. Give it money. Tell them you were motivated to by Japan’s current predicament. You’ll be happy, Japan will recover quickly, and your local charity will appreciate your kindness.

On behalf of myself and the other folks in our community, thank you for your kindness and support.

This post is released under a Creative Commons license. Patrick intends to translate it into Japanese over the next few days, but if you want to translate it or otherwise use it, please feel free.]

Patrick McKenzie is an ex-Japanese salaryman who currently runs a small software business. His main product at present is Bingo Card Creator, a product aimed at making elementary school teachers’ lives easier. Check out his blog, MicroISV on a Shoestring.

 
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Posted by on March 14, 2011 in Japan

 

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CREATING ABUNDANCE — The One Most Impactful Thing I Did To Create Abundance.

Plumeria

Have you ever used affirmations? They have helped me to undo negative programming, to change my self talk. It takes a lot of repeating a positive affirmation to undo deeply held negative beliefs. I’m talking about saying an affirmation 1000 times a day or more. I used to say them while I commuted over and over. Sometimes I would sing them or say them in different tones. You can say them silently while waiting in lines.Some people like to say them to a mirror.

You can get results with some general abundance affirmations like —

I am rich.

I am worthy.

I am enough.

I think it is more effective to use your own personal abundance affirmation. Usually I say abundance rather than money because abundance is so much more than money.

When I was seeking my own personal abundance affirmation, a thought came in my head —

This is easy, my affirmation will be something like work until you drop.

Was I surprised when I got all quiet and relaxed and asked to be shown my affirmation.

I have an inner sanctuary in my creative imagination. I go there to rejuvenate. In it, I have an information room with a computer. I looked at the screen in my mind’s eye and saw the words on it–

I am taking time for myself to love and be loved.

Time was always an issue for me. I pressured myself to accomplish. For me, this affirmation is perfect. It often helps me make decisions about what I want to do.

If I was to look for an affirmation in my mind, it would have been work till you drop. This affirmation of taking time for myself comes from a deeper part of me, from my inner wisdom.

How can you get in touch with your inner wisdom and receive the abundance affirmation that is for you? You need to relax and listen inwardly. You can ask to be shown in a dream state or in meditation. Do you have other ways that you use to connect to your inner wisdom?

Have your best week ever.

© 2010 Jeanne Litt, All rights reserved.

 
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Posted by on March 2, 2011 in Abundance

 

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When I’m 64!

When I’m 64!

Ah, that would be today! Yay, I’m alive. I’m not a wasn’t or an isn’t. I love the Dr. Seuss Happy Birthday To You book.

A younger blogger wrote about having crow’s feet. Here is me trying to hide my crow’s face.

Today is mine. I am letting go of all the things on my plate

— the drawing I am working on for OWOH. It was supposed to be ‘easy’. I’ve been at it over 20 hours so far and it’s what I want to do but not today. XD

 

I find myself cleaning of all things. I love everything all clean and uncluttered. My inner child loves to clean. My outer child does NOT. I will make it fun however.

I’m wearing my favorite blouse. It’s knit silk and I already got some kukui oil on it and I will be cleaning in it, but hey, It’s my birthday. I asked dh to take a photo of me to show you, I was so pleased that I didn’t have muffin top. Turns out my delusions are better than my eyesight, so no photo.

Since it’s my birthday and that is like being Queen of the universe, I wish for you all to have your best day ever!

© 2010 Jeanne Litt, All rights reserved.

 
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Posted by on February 28, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

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CREATING ABUNDANCE — A GENERAL LOOK

Plumeria

Once, I had the experience of rating the main areas of my life.

Finances

Health

Life Work

Social/Relationships

I rated them on a scale of 1 to 10, how I saw them in the moment. Try it.

Notice your lowest rated area. Sit quietly and listen inside. You know that phrase Let Go and Let God, or nature or a higher power. Do that now.

The more you can relax the easier it is to hear your inner wisdom.

With your breathing, focus on exhaling as completely as you can. The inhale will take care of itself.  Push your breath out as long as you comfortably can. Blow out imaginary candles.

As you continue reading, be aware of your breathing. Feel yourself relaxing.

What would improve your area that you gave the lowest rating?

Can you think of something to change about that area of your life?

Is there any new behavior you could try out?

What does this area have to teach you?

Is there anything for you to forgive? I’m not talking about forgiving any particular circumstance in your life, I’m talking about forgiving yourself for judging yourself in any way. Know that you always did the best you could, given your circumstances at that moment.

Right now is where it is happening. Stay in this place, stay in now. Yesterday is over. Abundance is not there. It is available here and now. If you are having trouble staying present with right now — observe the seat of your chair against your body, the temperature in the room, your breathing.

If there are a lot of challenges for you in your life now, there are also blessings. Everything is a blessing. There is a silver lining to every cloud. Even poop can be composted.

A big secret to creating abundance is composting the poop of your life and enriching your life with this fertilizer. If you have lemons make lemonade.

You are the perfect one for your position in life, the perfect CEO of yourself, inc.

Is there any little change you can make to improve your life? I’m talking small here, so small that it will be easy to do. For e.g. smile at someone, or take three relaxing breaths or turn off the light as you leave the room or any number of things that you think of.

Now rate these four areas of your life as they are right now. : )

Finances

Your Health

Your Life Work

Social/Relationships

I hope you find like I did, that they are better. For me, I had a headache and by the time I relaxed a little it was a much better rating.

Bless you. XD

© 2010 Jeanne Litt, All rights reserved.

 
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Posted by on February 23, 2011 in Abundance, How to

 

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FEEL GOOD FRIDAY – Projections


The Girl Next Door Grows Up
Blog started this Feel Good Friday meme. Pick one of her prompts and write about it on your blog!

*

The thing that made me happiest this week was odd.

*

Last week I went ballistic when, in my perception, my husband negated my experience. I was raving.

Then a  writer I know, had her booklet translated into Japanese by her son’s girlfriend. Oh, I wanted that for my novel. Maybe it could be a hit in Japan. It’s about … well here’s the pitch –

Koh, is a boy kidnapped as a toddler by a rainforest band that has unique customs and world view. Koh, fascinated by strange people who live near the mountain, struggles to find where he really belongs and overcome strict taboos.

These include: remaining unseen, bypassing capture by warring bands, coping with betrayal by his peers and facing death. Eventually he comes to reunion with the family he doesn’t remember.

I didn’t even tell my husband and I went and asked the writer to ask the girlfriend if she would consider translating my book. Then I set to wondering how to pay for it, a lifetime supply of lei, my firstborn…

Alas, the girl said no; it takes too much time. She did it as a labor of love.

I wasn’t even upset, I felt elated and do you know why? Normally, I would have talked myself out of asking. I WOULD HAVE NEGATED MY DESIRE. And that is why I got so upset, when I perceived my husband as negating my experience because that’s what I do to myself. I am so happy, all I have to do is not negate myself any more and not project it on others.

Wonder what I will be like when I  deal with the gazillion other things I am projecting on him and others. : )

© 2010 Jeanne Litt, All rights reserved.

 
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Posted by on February 18, 2011 in Japan, writing

 

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Creating Abundance – Claim Your Power

Plumeria

Would you like to have more of the things you want in life? And less of what you don’t want? Using a practical, spiritual approach, you can discover what true abundance is for you and begin manifesting it. Abundance in the world follows naturally from being connected with your inner abundance. It doesn’t work to demand it. It comes in as a byproduct as you get in touch with the goodness you are.

If you haven’t read it see here for last week’s assignment. or to recap  — I asked you to write a paragraph about your financial state. You don’t have to share it with anyone, it’s just for you. If you haven’t done that consider doing it now.

edible crysanthemum

Now take a moment to be quiet inside yourself. Exhale for as long as you comfortably can. Allow your lungs to be refilled with clean air.  Exhale again for as long as you comfortably can. Push the air out, as if you are blowing out candles.

Remember to yourself, that you have all the resources necessary to handle your life. If you don’t believe this, pretend for the purposes of this exercise. Let that sink in.

Now take a fresh sheet of paper and write a paragraph about your financial state from this place inside of you.

© 2010 Jeanne Litt, All rights reserved.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on February 16, 2011 in Abundance, How to

 

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